Create, Destroy: Performance Art and the Photograph as Both Document and Artform

I spent the weekend in London, where I went to see the Performing for the Camera exhibition at the Tate Modern. I don’t normally post extensively about exhibitions that I’ve seen, but this one really left an impression. In part, because the topic is close to themes which I have worked with and written about in the past, and in part because it triggered the realisation that my lull in visual creativity during recent months has been at least partially caused by a failure to immerse myself in outside influence. Visiting galleries, spending time with other artists, discussing inspiration and ideas, and paying attention to things that are going on in the visual arts world.

It hasn’t been intentional, simply that since late in 2015, I developed an interest in a completely new area, and when that happens, my mind tends to become obsessive about learning in that single area for a while, before levelling out to re-include my other interests. There’s benefits to this, and drawbacks. The major benefit, of course, being that I learn the basics of something very rapidly, meaning that I can find out whether or not something is likely to become a long term interest rather than a passing fancy, without dedicating an overlong amount of time to it first. The drawbacks, as already mentioned, include complete lack of activity or progress in other areas of interest, for a while.

Amongst the artists exhibited, and what originally caught my attention, are Francesca Woodman, Erin Wurm, and the mention of progression into the ultra-modern, with use of social media as a platform for performance exhibition.

The exhibition deals with the relationship between performance art and the photograph as both document and art form in and of itself, and links in with an interest I have had since my university days related to the creation of something with the sole intent to photograph it. My own dissertation dealt with work such as Thomas Demand‘s paper (re)constructions of spaces and scenes, and  James Casebere‘s Blue Hallway. Essentially, the concept of creating something which by itself is temporary, fleeting, or intended to be destroyed, and utilising photography to effect a permanent form of the work.

Amalia Ulman‘s work using Instagram as a platform for performance exhibition links in to topics I wrote about a short while back, discussing the relationship (or not) of historical self portraiture, and the modern ‘selfie’, and the emergence of DIY curation and non-traditional formats for exhibition. Her work is displayed within the exhibition as the Instagram feeds themselves, on iPads which viewers can scroll through – and this itself has potential to require further debate regarding the idea of art within the gallery environment. This is art which does not require a traditional exhibition format in order to exist and succeed in reaching viewers. And it succeeds in this, in fact, to such an extent that it eventually finds a place within one of the most well known galleries in the world. It’s a circle back on itself, in some ways, that is equally bizarre and fascinating.

Performing for the Camera will examine the relationship between photography and performance, from the invention of photography in the 19th century to the selfie culture of today. Bringing together over 500 images spanning 150 years, the exhibition will engage with the serious business of art and performance, as well as the humour and improvisation of posing for the camera.
Identity and self-image were also important for artists like Jeff Koons and Andy Warhol in their own marketing and promotional photographs, and in more playful works like Mike Mandel’s Baseball Photographer Trading Cards 1974 in which photographers pose as ‘collectable’ baseball players. The world of social media will be addressed in a key recent work staged on Instagram by Amalia Ulman. The exhibition will show not only that photography has always been performative, but that much performance art is inherently photographic.

Further links and resources can be found on a Pinterest board which I am continuing to add to, containing various exhibition information, reviews and artists, plus any related material relevant to the overall topic.